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  1. My son is 30 months. My son does not like to eat any thing.when meal is served he runs out of sight. He is underweight weighs only 24 pounds. It worries me more. I am frustrated and tired everything ,I can.I don’t know when my child starts feeding himself. Help My child and me please!

    • Hi Guari,

      I understand how frustrating and upsetting feeding difficulties can get, truly, but I would recommend starting by implement these strategies here. If they seem like too much of a jump then I would suggest starting in small baby steps by breaking it down into small manageable steps like first eating at a kids table for a few minutes, for example. I’m also available for private consultations. You can find more on that in the menu bar.

  2. I need help with my picky eater. He was born prematurely and has been under weight…He his now 7yrs old and weighs about 45lbs. He loves pizza, chicken nuggets, macaroni etc. We sometimes have to force him to eat the food that’s cooked at dinnertime…..and when he’s at school that is a different issue because he sometimes don’t eat the school lunch…I just want him to move up on the weight chart…..and gain some weight.

    PLEASE GIVE ME ANY SUGGESTIONS!!!!

    • Hi Teshia, I completely understand how stressful this is, and I want to help, but I need some more info… Have you ever tried feeding therapy or seen a gastroenterologist? Have you tried any supplements like pediasure? I don’t know your specific situation, but I would highly recommend starting to make changes to make meals no pressure for him. He needs meals to start being positive. Give him a preferred food at each meal and being to have just non preferred foods on the table or his plate. Truly, the first step is getting a positive meal with structure (move towards the steps on this page).

      There is is no pressure at all, but I’m also available for consults, as you are in a specific situation.

    • replying to Teshia, you are not alone! I also have a 7 1/2 yr old who is only about 41 lbs! She’s not so much a picky eater, she just doesn’t like to take the time to sit down and finish a meal. She tells me she doesn’t like to eat because she would rather go play. I don’t see her get hungry enough and also feel that she isn’t putting on the weight she should.

  3. We need help! My daughter only eats less than ten things and last month she had the stomach flu and is now on a jag fromantic some of the things she used to eat! Can you help us?
    Heather

    • I would start by making sure that you are following all of these steps. Eliminate any pressure for her to eat and encourage her to begin touching and interacting with foods. See the consulting services tab if you would like some specific one on one help.

  4. I love this so much! I have put these tips into effect in my home and have seen progress in just a few days. Thank you so much! I am going to share with my friends via my cute boy’s instagram account. IG: camshappygrams

  5. Today I asked our pediatrician for a second time (first at 9 months) about my almost 11-month old son and his delay in taking ANY solids. He’s been exclusively breastfed from birth with no weight issues, and normal development in other areas. We’ve offered pureed foods, finger foods and a broad variety; experimented with feeding in high chair or from laps, but to date he’s only attempted seven Cheerios, six of which he vomited back up forcefully. He put some pear near his mouth once, and will mash bananas with his fingers but studiously avoid putting any food in his mouth. I won’t force feed him. Ped seems unconcerned for now but my parent radar says “something is off here!” We use many of the suggestions you have here but no progress yet. Two questions: does this fall under the scope of your email consultation option? And should I be concerned that he is an outlier in development for this? (We have an almost 4 yr old with no oral issues – they are all so different!) Thanks in advance for any direction you can provide.

    • Hi Amy, I’m glad that you are trusting your instincts and reached out. It is so unfortunate, but many doctors give this advice because most have had little to no training in feeding difficulties. It sounds like there are some underlying issues going on, which may be able to managed with some simple strategies. An email consult may be appropriate and it is certainly up to you, but talking in person is more helpful for most people if it is something they are really concerned about. Don’t hesitate to send me an email if you want the consult directions before purchasing directly from the consult page (alisha@yourkidstable.com). Also, if you haven’t seen it already check the article index in the menu bar for two articles on “how to transition your child to table food”. You will likely need some more specific help, but this is a good place to start. Let me know if you have any questions!

  6. My son is 12 months old and was loving his green beans, peas, and mashed potatoes. Now he doesn’t want them. So confusing! Also, do I put all foods on his high chair at once, both preferred and non preferred foods? Or do I do one at a time? I have been trying to give non preferred foods first and he holds out until i give him the preferred food. Is it ok if he only eats the preferred food at mealtime? I feel like hes not getting enough to eat when he does this.

    • I think it is best to put a few pieces of everything down at a time. Try to go about your meal, and when he gets to a non preferred food that he is refusing try to change something up like stick it on a fork for him. Or, you can use a dip or sauce to help him.

    • Try to reduce milk to 16oz a day and begin to pair with a meal or shortly after the meal. It is okay if he eats mostly preferred foods, but demonstrate and try to get him to try some of the other foods. See the picky eater articles in the article index (menu bar) for more ideas! Let me know how it goes.

  7. (Add-on from ^above^ post) Also wanted to note that we put an emphasis on whole milk- 5 oz/ 4x day but we don’t give that at mealtime. Also, how long should we sit there and “wait” for him to eat the unpreferred foods..he usually just plays with it or throws it down.

  8. I have a 3 year old son who is SO fussy with eating. All he will eat is Weetabix, Ready Brek, bread, custard, some fruits, cucumber, cheese and of course choc and sweets. He will not eat any meat at all or any vegetables. We always eat together and we always make him sit at the table although sometimes he refuses to sit up. Any suggestions how I can get him to eat dinners?

    • Even though he isn’t eating a large variety you are off to a good start. Having this foundation is critical to more advanced techniques. I would suggest trying to figure out the root of the problem, I have a post on that “Why Kids Don’t Eat.” (See the article index in the menu bar) Then, you can begin to address any underlying issues, if any. I would also recommend serving food family style, and taking a no pressure approach. It may take a few days, weeks, or even months, but once he sees that you aren’t pressuring him to eat any other foods. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t offer them though. I would really take a look around the article index you will find LOTS of specific tips there! Let me know if I can be more help.

  9. So what if we already do these things and our 17 month old is still refusing meals?

    We were previously obsessive and intrusive about getting her to eat, but we’ve tried very hard to back off and keep a structured meal schedule. We always try to include at least one thing that we know she liked – most of the time, it is 2-3 things. But she will still poke at it, throw most of it on the floor in favor of playing with the plate, etc. We do our best not to scold her or cajole her into eating, but we do firmly let her know that (when it’s dinner) she will get no other food before bedtime, so if she is hungry then she should eat. She *might* then munch on one thing and then say “out!” so we will take her out of the booster seat.

    Today she ate breakfast, refused lunch, took a nap, ate a snack, then refused dinner. And of course woke up at 12 am screaming for milk and would not go back to sleep or stop screaming until she got it. By this I mean I finally caved and gave her milk at around 1:40 am after she started hyperventilating and screaming like a limb was cut off, and now she is asleep and I can finally go to sleep now (instead I’m posting this, lol).

    So…long story short, what should parents do when they have already tried all these things but the behavior is not changing? By this I mean that we started the new eating schedule/habits 2-3 months ago and she’s still refusing meals; most of the time they end up on the floor.

    What now?

    • Right, these are just the “basics”. Having all this stuff in place allows you to move onto more advanced strategies with success.

      Does she like crunchy food? It sounds like there is an underlying issue going on… I want you to head over to the article index (in the menu bar) and look under picky eating for the post “Why kids don’t eat”. See if you have some insights there. Also, see “turning my picky eater around”.

      Take a look at those and let me know if you have more questions, I’d be happy to help, but you will find lots of specific strategies there.

  10. I would love to read your tips, but the page this is posted on has videos that run automatically, which turns off my baby monitor app. As a busy mom of a toddler, the only downtime I have to read is during her nap time, but unfortunately my device (iPhone) can’t run both these at once. I don’t know if anyone else has had this problem, but I thought I’d bring it to your attention as something to be aware of. Thanks!

    • Thanks Shauna, I appreciate that. I have not heard of that. I don’t choose the ads that appear, but work with an ad agency that places them. I will bring this to their attention, and, yes, if anyone else has this happening please let me know.

  11. Hi,
    These are all great tips! I have two questions thought, how long should mealtimes last for a 19 month old before I let her off of her highchair? And if she eats her preferred foods and starts to play with the non preferred food or starts to throw them off of the night chair, should I just let her do it?

    • At the longest the meal should be 30 minutes. At the shortest, well, it could only be 7-8 minutes. You don’t have to let her throw food on the floor, as you can tell her, “food stays on the table.” Stay calm and consistent. Her playing with the non preferred food is great!

  12. My grandson as spd…he is 4 and his eating is out of control…he is about 30 pounds overweight and never feels full. He is now taking food and hiding to eat it. We desperately need help to manage this!

    • I would start by implementing these steps, enforce the schedule and provide lots of crunchy low calorie foods like carrot sticks, celery sticks, nuts, etc. Only allow food at meals and eat with him, the meal should not last more than 30 minutes.

  13. My daughter is 17 months and is very picky. She often ears fruit, a PBJ or easy mac most days of the week for her lunch or dinner. I have tried to switch up what we eat for her to have more variety, but she won’t even try most things. Is she old enough to only make one thing for a meal instead of having to make 4 or 5 different things let meal sometimes? I don’t want her to go hungry and worry that if I don’t make other options if she doesn’t eat the first meal. Any advice is much appreciated.

    Blair

    • It is hard when they are this young, but I would serve 1-2 things you know she eats and if she doesn’t eat let her get down. Don’t overly cater too much, she will learn you will just get something else. It is normal for toddlers to eat well at one meal and then not at the next few. Also, offer other foods at the meals too. Lastly, make sure you are spacing meals like I describe on this page. Let me know if you need more help!

    • Well, then that is on them. If they eat a food more than 50% of the time than it is considered preferred. If they choose not to eat it then let them know they will be on there won’t be any more food until the next meal and that is it. I know can seem hard, but they get the idea pretty quickly. The schedule and no snacking are key too.

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