100+ Awesome and Easy Sensory Diet Activities - Your Kid's Table
Your Kids Table

This is the ultimate list of sensory diet activities for kids created by an OT/Mom. Many ideas can be done with common household items and are easy to use and put into your routine!

100+ Awesome and easy sensory diet activities that you can start using in your home today! Find the best activities for your kid.

I’ve been wanting to write this post for a while now, its a big one, filled to the brim with sensory diet activities you can use for your child or toddler.  Heck, many of these ideas work for adults, too. So, no matter what your age, the following list will be a great jumping off point for creating a sensory diet or for adding some new activities into the mix.  If the whole sensory diet thing is new to you, make sure you read What is a Sensory Diet first!

Before we get started on this incredible list though, I want to announce a brand new, FREE workshop that I’m co-teaching: How to Create a Successful, No-Stress Sensory Diet in 4 Simple Steps.  This workshop is live and we’ve filled it with tons of sensory tips as we share our exclusive sensory plan. Not to mention that there’ll be a live Q/A, too! If you think or know that your child has sensory needs, then this workshop is a must.  I’ll share some more details later in the post, but you can grab your spot now!

And, as promised, I’ll also be announcing the winners to the Sensory Solutions Class scholarship! You’ll also find this exciting news at the end of the post!

Whew, so much exciting stuff going on today, aren’t you glad you stopped in? I am!

I’m thrilled for you to check out this mega list of sensory diet activities, but there are a couple of caveats that are incredibly important to pay attention to first. Please read these before trying any sensory activities with your child…

Sensory Diet Activity Guidelines

  1. Never ever ever force your child to do any sensory diet activity. Sensory activities aren’t homework or medicine, and they work best when a child is motivated to participate in them. It’s really important to keep in mind that in many cases, kids may be refusing a sensory activity because it is overwhelming to their unique sensory system, even if it isn’t to yours.  The finger paints that you may think aren’t so bad to touch, can actually be perceived as painful to your child.

That’s not to say that you can’t demonstrate, model, and encourage. That’s what we OT’s do, we want to push kids out of their comfort zone just a little and follow THEIR lead as much as possible. Experiencing new sensory input can have wonderful effects on their development, but when we force them to do so, its almost a guarantee that it will backfire.  

  1. This list is meant to inspire, not overwhelm.  If you’re just getting your feet wet with sensory diets, then take it slow and just pick a few activities that seem really manageable. Try them a few times and see if your child has a positive response.  I have focused on keeping these activities simple, with little or no set-up.
    1. Your child’s sensory needs may change from day to day or even hour to hour, remember that just because a particular activity or strategy didn’t work on this list today, doesn’t mean it won’t tomorrow. The idea is to have a toolbox full of sensory activities that you can pull from as you need to. However, not all activities will benefit your child. There will be some they don’t like or seem interested in, ever. That’s fine.

If you aren’t quite sure what a sensory diet is or if your child needs one, then check out my last post where I explain what sensory diet’s are all about.  Understanding what they are and who they’re for, will help you create a sensory diet that is easy to manage and that really makes a difference in your kid’s life.

 

Sensory Diet Activities

You will find that all of the activities are organized into different groups, please note that there is some cross over, and duplications, as appropriate. Many of these activities give sensory input to several senses. While there are categories listed (calming, alerting, etc.), please note that these are generalizations. It is possible your child could have a different response, as everyone’s sensory system is unique. Again, make sure you watch how your child responds during and after the activity:

  • Do they seem calmer?
  • More attentive?
  • Focused?
  • Are they sleeping better?
  • Or eating better?  
  • Are they interacting and communicating more with others?
  • Did they follow directions more easily?
  • Were they able to learn something quicker?

Making these observations will help you determine how they are responding to a particular sensory diet activity, and when you should use that activity or one similar to it again!  AND, if you want a little more guidance and a nifty free printable check out my sensory diet template, and you’ll be able to hone in on those beneficial activities even better.

Below, you will find many of the activities include a link to a DIY tutorial or an affiliate link, as some of these tools might be new to you.  Everything on this list are sensory tools and toys that I love and use.

Sensory Activities that Improve Attention, Focus, & Engagement

(Often called organizing activities because they typically allow kids sensory systems to become more balanced which leads to improved learning, communication, sleep, eating, etc.)

Jumping

Jumping on the bed is a perfect sensory diet activity. Get 100+ ideas here

  • on bed
  • couch
  • trampoline

Climbing

Swinging

A very powerful sensory diet activity, swinging. Find over 100 more ideas

  • outdoor swings
  • indoor swings
  • porch swings
  • swinging child in a blanket

Riding

  • scooter board
  • bikes
  • scooters
  • skateboard
  • roller blades
  • sleds
  • any of the above over bumps or down hills
  • seesaw

Pushing/Pulling Heavy Objects

Pushing and pulling heavy objects like a tire can be a powerful sensory diet activity

  • carrying groceries
  • pushing empty garbage cans inside
  • raking leaves
  • pulling weeds
  • shoveling snow
  • vacuuming
  • pushing grocery cart
  • carrying a laundry basket
  • a rope tied to a door knob or heavy object (see image at top)

Chewing

 

Vibration (is alerting versus calming when used in short bursts)

Playing active games

Drinking something cold

Swimming

Crashing and jumping into pillows (put all of your pillows or stuffed animals in a pile on the floor)

Huge list of sensory diet activities

Playing with textures

  • shaving cream
  • finger Paint
  • mud
  • wet sand
  • water
  • ice

Blowing

Rolling on a large ball on back or belly

Sitting on a large ball

  • during meals
  • for homework/in school

 

Scratching their back vigorously for a few minutes

Spinning (***a very intense sensory experience, best for kids to spin themselves even if they love spinning. Be very cautious of spinning a child, and only do so a few times in both directions. This is important because it will help balance out their system.)

Sensory Activities that are Calming

Wearing Tight Clothing

Wearing compression or weighted vests for 10-20 minutes during difficult times of the day (i.e. transitions)

Quiet time in sensory tent

Playing in sensory bin (tons of ideas, the sky is the limit)

Playing in a soothing texture can be a calming activity for a sensory diet.

  • rice
  • beans
  • birdseed
  • sand
  • cloud dough
  • noodles

Massage

Kneeding playdough or therapy putty

Handling fidget toys (a wide variety of options)

Squeezing a stress ball can be very calming and reduce anxiety for kids. A great activity to include in a sensory diet.

Squishing and squeezing

  • hugs
  • squeezing into tight spots or behind furniture
  • wrapping up tightly in blanket
  • sleeping in stretchy sheets that are tucked in on sides
  • laying under a large yoga ball

 

Using essential oils (different types of oils are used to calm or be alert, check out this get start guide)

  • in room diffusers
  • applying to skin
  • in bath

Listening to rhythmic or soft music

Wearing noise cancelling headphones

Watching slow moving or soothing images

Drinking something warm

Sucking on a piece of hard candy or a lozenge

Slow rocking

  • Rocking chair
  • Hammock
  • Glider

Using heavy or weighed blankets or lap pads

Vibration (is calming rather than alerting when used for longer periods of time)

 


 

Now that you have this huge list of sensory diet ideas, what’s next? How do you know which activities to use with your child and when? How often should you do them?

Those are all very important questions, and I’m going to answer them for you in next week’s free workshops that I’m co-hosting (2 days/times available): How to Create a Successful, No-Stress Sensory Diet for Kids in 4 Simple Steps

As an OT, sensory is one of my specialties, in the workshop we’ll be giving you our expert know-how with the practicality of real-life mom.  This sensory stuff can get overwhelming pretty fast, and for good reason, in the workshop we’re going to be putting an end to that! We aren’t in the business of wasting time, we have been working hard for months on this for YOU, and it is worth every minute of your time because what you’ll learn could be a total game changer for you and your child!

Make sure you save yourself a seat, we don’t know when we’ll be offering this opportunity again!

***Click here to join the free sensory workshop!!!***


Sensory Solutions Class Scholarship

It’s time now to announce the two winners of the scholarships for the simple but intensive sensory class I co-teach, Sensory Solutions, that opens in a few weeks!

First, we want to thank everyone that took time to submit an application, it was incredibly difficult to choose the winners, and we ended up extending it to three parents. For those of you that don’t see your name below, we aren’t going to leave you hanging! We do have the amazing consolation prize of the workshop next week, where we will teach you our four step plan for FREE.

Without further ado, the winners of the scholarship are:

Sara Earl

Dennae Turner

Brandy Millard

Thank you all again, it was a privilege to receive your responses, we hope to see you live in the workshop (remember there’s a live Q/A at the end, you’ll be able to ask us, your questions!)

 

More Sensory Diet Activities

Powerful Proprioceptive Activities that Calm, Focus, & Alert

Everything Oral Sensory: The Total Guide

Sensory Strategies for Wild Kids

13 Easy Sensory Strategies for the Classroom

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